Tag Archives: writing

Stop Procrastinating

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Most writers struggle with this and it interferes with their creativity and the ability to get their manuscript completed. Yes I am talking about that dreaded word, Procrastination.

According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: “Procrastination refers to the act of replacing high-priority actions with tasks of lower priority, or doing something from which one derives enjoyment, and thus putting off important tasks to a later time according to Psychologist.”

Procrastination can prevent you from accomplishing great things in your writing process, possibly even success. Writing is a process that takes dedication and set goals. A writer might start a project or manuscript and lay it down due to procrastination. They may think it is writers block and perhaps it could be. Could it feasibly be that they are dreading the outcome of the story the way it is going. You might decide to lay the story down and hope it takes a swift turn in another direction. It won’t happen unless you make it, by rewriting it yourself. Words don’t just magically appear on paper. They are formed first in the brain and transcribed by your hand onto paper. I use this concept perhaps because I am a nurse and I tend to use biological principles in my writing.

Procrastinating about something is not because of laziness. It could be from fear, anxiety about the outcome, lack of self control, impulse, etc… There are too many to name. The answer is to find a way around procrastinating.

1. Set simple goals- Tell yourself that you are going to write 1000 words a day or 2 chapters a day, etc… If you have self control issues, it is good to set goals to help you overcome this.

2. Relax and quit worrying about the outcome. you can always edit your manuscript when you are finished.

3. Stay focused. Quit thinking about things that need to be done. When you set down to write, your focus needs to be on writing not on things like bills.

4. Think about the prize. What reward is there when you finish your writing? Not only will you have a completed manuscript but you’ll have gratification in your completed work.

How Point of View Changes the Story

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There are different points of view in stories. What is a point of view? A point of view is the way a story is told by the narrative voice or the viewpoint. Whether a short story, children’s story or any genre, a point of view can change a story drastically. When an author begins their story, they have to decide how they will convey their story best by the point of view they use. Point of view is defined by the pronouns that are used. It is important to continue the story in the same point of view. If an author starts using a certain point of you, then shifts to a different point of view, it makes it harder to read and more confusing.

First person point of view is when the author uses the words, “I or me” to tell the story. First person is used when the author acts as a narrator.

Second person is when the author uses, “you or your” to tell the story. This is the one that is used the least amount of time. Rarely does the author talk directly to the reader.

Third person is when the author uses, “he, she, it and they” to tell the story. Often they use the characters names when writing the story.

Now lets look at how Point of view can change a story. A story written in first person looks like a memoir or personal biography and that might not be the case. Second person point of view is used to personally address the reader. Third person point of view is used more in novels and fiction writing and brings the characters perspective into view. It tells us what they might be thinking and why they are acting the way they are.

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If an author is writing a nonfiction book and uses the first person to tell the story and they are not an expert of the subject, the story might not reach the reader. If the author changes the point of view to third person and use quotes from an expert, the story becomes more valid to the reader, and it might hold more klout.

 

Differences in Narrative and Dialogue Writing

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To fully understand the difference in writing a narrative point of view versus using dialogue, one must look at the way it is written. First look at the definition of the two. A narrative is the way a story or set of events is portrayed using descriptive accounts and experiences in either the past, present or the future. The story evolves around one or several different characters but is usually told by one person overlooking the events as they unravel. A narrative is told in this fashion for entertainment or informally to tell the story.

Now lets look at dialogue. Dialogue is usually written as a conversation between two people sometimes between one person talking to himself. This form of writing is much more fun and is used more to portray the characters in a certain likeness. If their speech is poor, you assume they come from a poor background. If they used refined elegant speech, you assume that they have been well-educated. It’s funny how reading something can show different perspectives according to the actual reader. If the reader is in a bad mood, they might see the whole story as having a dark tone. The opposite can happen if they are in a good mood. The reader has to observe the characters in their own view, as well as the way the writer intended them to be. If a writer tries to write a book for teenagers, they have to limit their vocabulary usage especially if they are much older. A person’s vocabulary is always changing from an early life until adulthood. Not two people on the earth have the same exact vocabulary. This shows how differently one person can perceive a story from another person.

One person might hate the story all together and think it is beneath them. Another person the same age might look at the story and really love it. Narrative writing is much easier to understand because the writer has more control over the intended understanding of the reader.

Other related articles: http://tracykauffman.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/what-is-point-of-view-and-how-it-changes-a-story/

http://ezinearticles.com/?Voice-in-Narrative-and-Dialogue—A-Contrast-of-Writing-Styles&id=31570

http://www.articletrader.com/science/education/writing-narrative-essay-can-be-simple-and-easy.html

http://www.articletrader.com/science/education/creative-writing-how-to-start-your-novel.html

Pricing your E-Book

booksE book sales are on the rise but what is the best price to pay for one. Many writers struggle at what a good price for their book may be. There are many things to take into consideration when pricing your E-Book.

  •  First, Look at the time it took you to write your book. Do you want to simply give away hours and hours of writing for a low price of 99 cents.
  •  Second, Look at what your soft cover sells for. If you are selling a soft cover book for 14.99, then people are more likely going to buy a 99 cent E Book over that price. You might make lots of E Book sales but who is going to buy your book. Most authors like the idea that their book is in people’s hands and others are reading what they have to say.
  •  Third, Adjust price accordingly. You might not want to price your books at 99 cents because you are not going to make anything if you do.  Look at what goes into writing a book. You spend countless hours writing, you pay someone to edit, you pay someone to design your cover art, then you spend money to market your book. You would have to sell quite a few books before you are making any kind of profit.
  • Last of all, people will judge the price of the book and think that it is not a good book by the price of it.  Usually well-known authors don’t price their books that low.  Readers will think that the book has no value or worth if it is priced too low.

Other related links:

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Price-Your-eBook—Some-Factors-to-Consider&id=7307868

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Price-Books-and-eBooks&id=7234410

Inspecting our Writings Imperfections

Writing a story or manuscript should come from within your desire to write, but by inspecting it’s imperfections will only make it better.  No author wants to be told that there are errors in their manuscript. Some mistakes may simply be small such as a misspelled word but other imperfections could be much larger.  No matter how long a writer may write a story, every story has imperfections.  Not one author has perfected writing on their first script.

Don’t be afraid to listen to criticism.  Not everyone is out to get you or hates your writing.  Some are actually offering you constructive criticism and it can only make you a better writer.  Just because you think that you are the greatest writer around doesn’t mean it is so.  You may simply be a writer that makes mistakes with grammar.  That is why it is necessary to get another opinion.  Ask someone that is not related to you to read your manuscript.  Don’t be afraid to edit, rewrite or simply start over.  The writing process is a long one but well worth it in the end.

Similar articles:  http://kate0murray.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/should-you-love-what-you-write/

The Need for Editing

If you are a new author than this post is for you. Most established authors know exactly why editing their manuscript is necesssary. I will try to cover some of the major reasons on this blog post.

First of all, we need to understand what exactly does editing mean. Editing is the process of selecting and preparing writtten, visual, audible and film media used to convey information through the processes of correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate, and complete work (Wikipedia: free encyclopedia).

Secondly, editing is important because you want your readers to come back and buy your books. If your book is hard to understand, your readers will become annoyed and irritated. If errors are distracting than they may simply put the book down because they can not get into the story-line. Some people don’t think that misplaced commas matter but let me tell you that they do.

Next, editing your work will cut out the clutter. You will notice that some things in your manuscript should be left out, due to redundancy and unclear expressions. They will often bore or confuse the reader.

Last of all, editing is important especially to the publisher. If you are searching for an agent or a publisher, you need to present your work as clean as possible. Most agents will put your work down if they cannot get through all the typos, incomplete sentences, comma splices, subject-verb disagreements. The list goes on and on.

Here at Garrison Publishing- we offer editorial services at a low fee. Come check out our packages. We have some of the lowest print packages available with marketing services available too.

Go to Garrison Publishing by clicking here.

Writers Born to Create

Student Reading a TextbookWere you born to write?  Writers are usually very creative people who love to invent anything from new stories to artistic related projects. Being creative doesn’t necessarily mean you can draw or sculpt something. Creativity deals with inventing new ways to look at the world around us. Creative people use the right side of their brains more. This means that the right brain or right hemisphere is more dominant than the left side. The right side deals with expression and creative task.

Characteristics of People that have right brain dominance are:

  • More expressive and share emotions
  • Love reading fantasy
  • Love listening to music
  • enjoy creative storytelling
  • considered dreamers
  • like to act out stories, such as in plays
  • Prefer to learn through free exploration
  • Enjoy interacting affectively with others
  • Like organizing things to show relation
  • right side controls body
  • Prefer visual instructions
  • enjoys art and attending plays
  • Enjoys writing fiction
  • Gets Bored easily
  • Thinks about more than one thing at a time
  • Has difficulty staying on task
  • Intuitive

Related links:

http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/a/left-brain-right-brain.htm

http://www.rightbrainintelligence.com/braindominanttest.htm

http://www.monroeinstitute.org/resources/brain-hemispheric-preference

Elements in Literature

Student Reading a Textbook

There are basically six different elements in Literature that make up a story. The plot, theme, setting, characterization, conflict and mood. Each person can analyze the elements in a different way. A teacher summarizing a story to her classroom could identify the story elements as:
1. characters
2. setting (person, place, time)
3. plot (ideas and events of story)
4. problem (conflict)
5. solution (resolution)

Another teacher might separate the character by using his character traits or actions. Or she could define the action words to describe the character and what he does. Examples are:
a. dependable (Tom never missed a day at work even if he was sick.)
b. credible (The witness spoke the truth which persuaded the jurors.)
c. ethical (She held her business to a higher standard.)
d. loyal (Devoted to his friend, he stood behind him.)
e. caring (He loved his friend like a brother.)
f. intelligent (He brilliantly answered the question.)
g. comforting (Jonas hugged the little girl because her dog was killed.)
h. patient (He waited patiently for the doctor to arrive.)
I. caring (He cared for his sick animal.)
j. self absorbed (He smugly looked at the others and said, ” I don’t care what you think.”)

Another might describe the elements of literature by defining the text by asking questions about the story, looking at how the story (text) is written or looking at the organization of the story… what order of events take place. How is the plot written? Some authors write in a set order while others rearrange the story from ending to beginning and vise-versa. No way is incorrect, just the way the writer chooses to write the story.

Other related stories:
http://ezinearticles.com/?5-Essential-Elements-of-a-Short-Story&id=7429750
http://ezinearticles.com/?Character-or-Plot:-What-Drives-Your-Writing?&id=7783325
http://ezinearticles.com/?On-Writing—What-Is-the-Definition-of-Literature-As-a-Genre?&id=6671263

Writing for Different Genres Can be Tricky

booksThere should be a distinct difference in writing for Children than Adults, because of the subject matter. Children are not capable of understanding the same things as an adult would. A theme, topic, or focus is much different for children, because their ability to grasp material and their awareness to data is much more limited than someone much older. A child’s communication and intellectual skills require memory, understanding and concentration. It is harder for a child with a small attention span to be able to sit down and read a story than a child with a longer one. Secondly children have to be able to reason and separate what they have read, understand the difference in what is fiction or fantasy. Next children have to understand vocabulary and understand descriptive language that is talked about in the story. Last of all, children have to be able to develop their own ideas of what they are reading, from things that they have learned about in the past. You would not talk about a complex topic to a small child that has no possible understanding of the subject. To be able to write or teach a young child, you have to be able to get down to their level of thinking by considering their intellectual development or understanding capabilities. This can be done by repetition of words, simple sentences vs. complex sentences and the use of pictures for descriptive purposes.

Then writing for historical fiction books instead of a plain literature fiction book has major differences? The fact is that writing in this genre is very difficult considering all the factors that go into this. Not only do you have to write the book, you have to study the person or time frame to a great extent. No one wants to portray a historical figure in a way that would be inappropriate of that person. Writing fiction does come so much easier than nonfiction because you can make the story and plot go as you would like it to go. When writing a historical fiction book one must consider the readers. What does the reader expect when buying this type of book? Another point is that an author must tell the reader in plain terms what this book is all about. Is this book merely for pleasure? Is this book a thorough detailed biography. Is the book written about someone famous but written in a completely false pretense. Even so, the author must consider whether writing about a real person without telling the whole truth could have some consequences to it. Whether it was written in a completely immoral way or in a way that was to entertain the reader. You must do your research, research things about your main character but watch the way the references portray your character. Do they give a precise time frame of events or leave some things to the imagination? Therefore I hope that this topic brings to light some important issues that an author should take into consideration in writing in this genre.

Now books written in the crime mystery genre are top sellers right now. Movies about detectives, murder, crime are making the list for books and films. This genre is interesting because it keeps the reader guessing on what will happen next. A hint of danger lures the reader into a web of deceit hoping to discover the truth before the end of the story. The author shouldn’t give too many clues to who committed the crime before the end of the book. Danielle Steel’s book Betrayal gave the answer in the middle of the book, leaving this reader wondering how she was going to end the story. I think it would have been better to find out much later than so early in the book.