Tag Archives: writing process

Stop Procrastinating

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Most writers struggle with this and it interferes with their creativity and the ability to get their manuscript completed. Yes I am talking about that dreaded word, Procrastination.

According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: “Procrastination refers to the act of replacing high-priority actions with tasks of lower priority, or doing something from which one derives enjoyment, and thus putting off important tasks to a later time according to Psychologist.”

Procrastination can prevent you from accomplishing great things in your writing process, possibly even success. Writing is a process that takes dedication and set goals. A writer might start a project or manuscript and lay it down due to procrastination. They may think it is writers block and perhaps it could be. Could it feasibly be that they are dreading the outcome of the story the way it is going. You might decide to lay the story down and hope it takes a swift turn in another direction. It won’t happen unless you make it, by rewriting it yourself. Words don’t just magically appear on paper. They are formed first in the brain and transcribed by your hand onto paper. I use this concept perhaps because I am a nurse and I tend to use biological principles in my writing.

Procrastinating about something is not because of laziness. It could be from fear, anxiety about the outcome, lack of self control, impulse, etc… There are too many to name. The answer is to find a way around procrastinating.

1. Set simple goals- Tell yourself that you are going to write 1000 words a day or 2 chapters a day, etc… If you have self control issues, it is good to set goals to help you overcome this.

2. Relax and quit worrying about the outcome. you can always edit your manuscript when you are finished.

3. Stay focused. Quit thinking about things that need to be done. When you set down to write, your focus needs to be on writing not on things like bills.

4. Think about the prize. What reward is there when you finish your writing? Not only will you have a completed manuscript but you’ll have gratification in your completed work.

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How Point of View Changes the Story

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There are different points of view in stories. What is a point of view? A point of view is the way a story is told by the narrative voice or the viewpoint. Whether a short story, children’s story or any genre, a point of view can change a story drastically. When an author begins their story, they have to decide how they will convey their story best by the point of view they use. Point of view is defined by the pronouns that are used. It is important to continue the story in the same point of view. If an author starts using a certain point of you, then shifts to a different point of view, it makes it harder to read and more confusing.

First person point of view is when the author uses the words, “I or me” to tell the story. First person is used when the author acts as a narrator.

Second person is when the author uses, “you or your” to tell the story. This is the one that is used the least amount of time. Rarely does the author talk directly to the reader.

Third person is when the author uses, “he, she, it and they” to tell the story. Often they use the characters names when writing the story.

Now lets look at how Point of view can change a story. A story written in first person looks like a memoir or personal biography and that might not be the case. Second person point of view is used to personally address the reader. Third person point of view is used more in novels and fiction writing and brings the characters perspective into view. It tells us what they might be thinking and why they are acting the way they are.

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If an author is writing a nonfiction book and uses the first person to tell the story and they are not an expert of the subject, the story might not reach the reader. If the author changes the point of view to third person and use quotes from an expert, the story becomes more valid to the reader, and it might hold more klout.

 

Innovation & Quality: Writing for Children with WritersWebTV

Writing workshops can help new authors from anything about illustrations with animation to publishing, collaboration with editors, cover art designers to finding an agent. I recommend any author to find a great workshop to attend in your area. Read this blog about “Innovation and Quality Writing” that discusses topics about writing, finding an agent, and ways to market.
Online workshops can be just as helpful, here are some writing workshop links.
http://www.newpages.com/writing-conferences/
http://www.raleighreview.org/Writers_House.html
https://www.kenyonreview.org/workshops/writers/
http://sff.onlinewritingworkshop.com/index.shtml
http://www.sff.net/odyssey/
http://blog.nanowrimo.org/

E.R.Murray

I recently watched the inaugural live online writing workshop ‘Finding the magic: Writing for Children’ – an innovative world first from WritersWebTV, presented by Vanessa O’Loughlin of writing.ie.

Although I wasn’t sure what to expect, I’ve had lots of wonderful experiences linked to Vanessaincluding finding my agent (Sallyanne Sweeney), the place I now call home and as a result, my husband! – so I was pretty certain that it would be a quality affair.

Although it’s not usually easy, I was willing to write off a day of writing to immerse myself in advice from talented authors and industry professionals. The list was impressive, with the likes of Michael Emberley, Marie Louise Fitzpatrick, Norton Vergien, Oisin McGann and Meg Rosoff on hand to share their knowledge of the industry and writing tips, answer questions and set short writing tasks.

Even though…

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Inspecting our Writings Imperfections

Writing a story or manuscript should come from within your desire to write, but by inspecting it’s imperfections will only make it better.  No author wants to be told that there are errors in their manuscript. Some mistakes may simply be small such as a misspelled word but other imperfections could be much larger.  No matter how long a writer may write a story, every story has imperfections.  Not one author has perfected writing on their first script.

Don’t be afraid to listen to criticism.  Not everyone is out to get you or hates your writing.  Some are actually offering you constructive criticism and it can only make you a better writer.  Just because you think that you are the greatest writer around doesn’t mean it is so.  You may simply be a writer that makes mistakes with grammar.  That is why it is necessary to get another opinion.  Ask someone that is not related to you to read your manuscript.  Don’t be afraid to edit, rewrite or simply start over.  The writing process is a long one but well worth it in the end.

Similar articles:  http://kate0murray.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/should-you-love-what-you-write/